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It’s low-carbs for good health, metabolism, weight loss … the times, they are a-changing – Epoch Times

June 5, 2015

Health

10 Proven Health Benefits of Low-Carb and Ketogenic Diets – Epoch Times

Low-carb diets have been controversial for decades.

They were originally demonized by fat-phobic health professionals and the media.
People believed that these diets would raise cholesterol and cause heart disease because of the high fat content.

However… times are changing.

Since the year 2002, over 20 human studieshave been conducted on low-carb diets.
In almost every one of those studies, low-carb diets come out ahead of the diets they are compared to.

Not only does low-carb cause more weight loss, it also leads to major improvements in most risk factors… including cholesterol.

Here are the 10 proven health benefits of low-carb and ketogenic diets.

1. Low-Carb Diets Kill Your Appetite (in a Good Way)

Hunger is the single worst side effect of dieting.
It is one of the main reasons why many people feel miserable and eventually give up on their diets.

One of the best things about eating low-carb is that it leads to an automatic reduction in appetite.

The studies consistently show that when people cut carbs and eat more protein and fat, they end up eating much fewer calories.

In fact… when researchers are comparing low-carb and low-fat diets in studies, they need to actively restrict calories in the low-fat groups to make the results comparable.
Bottom Line: When people cut carbs, their appetite tends to go down and they often end up eating much fewer calories without trying.

2. Low-Carb Diets Lead to More Weight Loss

Cutting carbs is one of the simplest and most effective ways to lose weight. Studies show that people on low-carb diets lose more weight, faster, than people on low-fat diets… even when the low-fat dieters are actively restricting calories.

One of the reasons for this is that low-carb diets tend to get rid of excess water from the body. Because they lower insulin levels, the kidneys start shedding excess sodium, leading to rapid weight loss in the first week or two.

In studies comparing low-carb and low-fat diets, the low-carbers sometimes lose 2-3 times as much weight, without being hungry.

3. A Greater Proportion of The Fat Lost Comes From The Abdominal Cavity

Not all fat in the body body is the same.

It’s where that fat is stored that determines how it will affect our health and risk of disease.

Most importantly, we have subcutaneous fat (under the skin) and then we have visceral fat (in the abdominal cavity).

Visceral fat is fat that tends to lodge around the organs.
Having a lot of fat in that area can drive inflammation, insulin resistance and is believed to be a leading driver of the metabolic dysfunction that is so common in Western countries today.

Low-carb diets are very effective at reducing the harmful abdominal fat.
Not only do they cause more fat loss than low-fat diets, an even greater proportion of that fat is coming from the abdominal cavity.
Over time, this should lead to a drastically reduced risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Bottom Line: A large percentage of the fat lost on low-carb diets tends to come from the harmful fat in the abdominal cavity that is known to cause serious metabolic problems.

4. Triglycerides Tend to go Way Down

Triglycerides are fat molecules.

It is well known that fasting triglycerides, how much we have of them in the blood after an overnight fast, are a strong heart disease risk factor.

Perhaps counter intuitively, the main driver of elevated triglycerides is carbohydrate consumption, especially the simple sugar fructose.
When people cut carbs, they tend to have a very dramatic reduction in blood triglycerides.

Compare this to low-fat diets, which can cause triglycerides to go up in many cases.
Bottom Line: Low-carb diets are very effective at lowering blood triglycerides, which are fat molecules in the blood and a well known risk factor for heart disease.

5. Increased Levels of HDL (the “good”) Cholesterol

High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) is often called the “good” cholesterol.

It’s actually wrong to call it “cholesterol”… all cholesterol molecules are the same.
HDL and LDL refer to the lipoproteins that carry cholesterol around in the blood.
Whereas LDL carries cholesterol from the liver and to the rest of the body, HDL carries cholesterol away from the body and to the liver, where it can be reused or excreted.
It is well known that the higher your levels of HDL, the lower your risk of heart disease will be.

One of the best ways to increase HDL levels is to eat fat… and low-carb diets include a lot of fat.

Therefore, it is not surprising to see that HDL levels increase dramatically on low-carb diets, while they tend to increase only moderately or even go down on low-fat diets.

The Triglycerides:HDL ratio is another very strong predictor of heart disease risk. The higher it is, the greater your risk of heart disease is.

By lowering triglycerides and raising HDL levels, low-carb diets lead to a major improvement in this ratio.

Bottom Line: Low-carb diets tend to be high in fat, which leads to an impressive increase in blood levels of HDL, often referred to as the “good” cholesterol.

There is actually a very simple solution to this problem… by cutting carbohydrates, you remove the need for all of that insulin. Both blood sugars and insulin go way down.

According to Dr. Eric Westman, who has treated many diabetics using a low-carb approach, he needs to reduce their insulin dosage by 50% on the first day.

In one study in type 2 diabetics, 95.2% had managed to reduce or eliminate their glucose-lowering medication within 6 months.

If you are currently on blood sugar lowering medication, then talk to your doctor before making changes to your carbohydrate intake, because your dosage may need to be adjusted in order to prevent hypoglycemia.

Bottom Line: The best way to lower blood sugar and insulin levels is to reduce carbohydrate consumption. This is also a very effective way to treat and possibly even reverse type II diabetes.

6. Reduced Blood Sugar and Insulin Levels, With a Major Improvement in Type 2 Diabetes

When we eat carbs, they are broken down into simple sugars (mostly glucose) in the digestive tract.

From there, they enter the bloodstream and elevate blood sugar levels.
Because high blood sugars are toxic, the body responds with a hormone called insulin, which tells the cells to bring the glucose into the cells and to start burning or storing it.

For people who are healthy, the quick insulin response tends to minimize the blood sugar “spike” in order to prevent it from harming us.
However… many, many people have major problems with this system. They have
what is called insulin resistance, which means that the cells don’t “see” the insulin and therefore it is harder for the body to bring the blood sugar into the cells.

This can lead to a disease called type 2 diabetes, when the body fails to secrete enough insulin to lower the blood sugar after meals. This disease is very common today, afflicting about 300 million people worldwide.
There is actually a very simple solution to this problem… by cutting carbohydrates, you remove the need for all of that insulin. Both blood sugars and insulin go way down.

According to Dr. Eric Westman, who has treated many diabetics using a low-carb approach, he needs to reduce their insulin dosage by 50% on the first day.

In one study in type 2 diabetics, 95.2% had managed to reduce or eliminate their glucose-lowering medication within 6 months.

If you are currently on blood sugar lowering medication, then talk to your doctor before making changes to your carbohydrate intake, because your dosage may need to be adjusted in order to prevent hypoglycemia.

Bottom Line: The best way to lower blood sugar and insulin levels is to reduce carbohydrate consumption. This is also a very effective way to treat and possibly even reverse type II diabetes.


7. Blood Pressure Tends to go Down

Having elevated blood pressure (hypertension) is an important risk factor for many diseases.

This includes heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and many others.
Low-carb diets are an effective way to reduce blood pressure, which should lead to a reduced risk of these diseases and help you live longer.

Bottom Line: Studies show that reducing carbs leads to a significant reduction in blood pressure, which should lead to a reduced risk of many common diseases.

8. Low-Carb Diets Are The Most Effective Treatment Known Against Metabolic Syndrome

The metabolic syndrome is a medical condition that is highly associated with the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

It is actually a collection of symptoms:
• Abdominal obesity
• Elevated blood pressure
• Elevated fasting blood sugar levels
• High triglycerides
• Low HDL levels

The good news is… all five symptoms improve dramatically on a low-carb diet.
Unfortunately, the government and major health organization still recommend a low-fat diet for this purpose, which is pretty much useless because it does nothing to address the underlying metabolic problem.

Bottom Line: Low-carb diets effectively reverse all 5 key symptoms of the metabolic syndrome, a serious condition known to predispose people to heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

9. Low-Carb Diets Improve The Pattern of LDL Cholesterol

Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) is often referred to as the “bad” cholesterol (again, it is actually a protein).

It is known that people who have high LDL are much more likely to have heart attacks.
However… what scientists have now learned is that the type of LDL matters. Not all of them are equal.

In this regard, the size of the particles is important. People who have mostly small particles have a high risk of heart disease, while people who have mostly large particles have a low risk.

It turns out that low-carb diets actually turn the LDL particles from small to large, while reducing the number of LDL particles floating around in the bloodstream.
Bottom Line: When you eat a low-carb diet, your LDL particles change from small (bad) LDL to large LDL – which is benign. Cutting carbs may also reduce the number of LDL particles floating around in the bloodstream.

10. Low-Carb Diets Are Therapeutic For Several Brain Disorders

It is often claimed that glucose is necessary for the brain… and it’s true.

SOURCE: http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/1376716-10-proven-health-benefits-of-low-carb-and-ketogenic-diets/?utm_source=Epoch10&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=10

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 06, 2015.  11:45 a.m. [GMT]

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2 Comments on “It’s low-carbs for good health, metabolism, weight loss … the times, they are a-changing – Epoch Times”

  1. banji Says:

    i was a sugar and processed carbs addict (cakes,chocolate, beer lol etc )until i discovered this paleo low carbs way of life and i can attest that i am much stronger and fitter than i was in university days. now i try to eat LESS processed and MORE local naija food (note ~not total carbs elimination) and i do intense labor in my own place as my exercise and my pre-diabetes symptoms disappeared.

    We are all the descendants of peasants( farmers, hunters, artisans, etc (people who led very physically-active lifestyles till their eighties (my grandfather had my father in his seventies and named him Isaac and he still lived till 104).

    Diabetes and other lifestyle diseases are called the clerk’s punishment because now we sit in one place working from a computer, stuffing our mouths with carbs and sugar drinks at work, and it is killing us slowly. Low carbs works. I am sticking to it.

    Like

    Reply

    • emotan77 Says:

      Dear Mr. Banji,

      Thanks very much for your testimony, a useful pointer that it can be done without medication.

      While I’m lucky not to carry any excess fat on my small frame, I was in the pre-diabetes range some time ago but after going online to check the prescrption I was given and noticing one of the descriptions of ‘metformin’ as a “gateway” drug, I told myself I wouldn’t want to go that route. I might always been a fairly disciplined eater but a review of my diet showed I was a carbs addict! Nigerian food, home-made pasta and sauce, rice … though not the dessert-eating kind of person gave me a wake-up call on dealing with my system that does not handle insulin properly.

      Here is my little diet, mostly gained from online sources and modified myself although for the first few months, I went fully on the prescribed diet:
      1st FRUIT and then all carbs in the morning, meaning rice OR beans OR pasta … but no oils, no protein (chicken, fish – haven’t eaten meat in close to 2 decades); The mixed veggies I put on the side of the plate as I cannot bear to put them on, for example, pasta are made up with cabbage, carrots, onions, fresh tomatoes, celery and green peppers. I make it fairly hot!

      Lunch and Dinner: chicken or fish plus Nigerian vegetables made with olive oil – yes, no epo pupa which, anyway, I did away with five years ago before the coming of ‘pre-diabetes’! I also eat nuts: groundnuts and cashews are plenty around in Nigeria but I eat groundnut and almonds – both saltless. I also eat sardines for the Omega-3, and I started making peanut butter – just throw 25 – 30 pieces in the blender and add olive oil. I like mine crunchy; grind to your taste but do not add sugar or salt.

      I’ve gone WAY BELOW my earlier designation but I keep working at fighting my system’s inability to handle insulin.

      My modified diet still has me eating fruits and MOST carbs in the morning but I’ve substituted my pastas and rice for whole grain ones; I indulge in whatever kind of wheat bread is available in Nigeria – I do not come across whole grains – some evenings; 1 – at most 2 – slices with sardines garnished with rodo – habanero – and sardines or add my own peanut butter.

      Luckily, I am a lover of beans, peas … which means I will eat three or four COOKED tablespoonfuls of beans after which I eat the Nigerian spicy veggies.

      Above has worked for me and best of all, I no longer feel deathly hungry as I once did: I could never have believed I could subsist on the tiny portions I’m now used to. Incredible, but true. Portion controls are also very important. If I feel hungry, I just grab some pea/ground nuts, but remember, because of the fat – if you are fighting weight, you have to keep consumption of nuts within limits: about 28 is supposedly about right for peanuts; check cashew number or other nuts online.

      I’m really happy about your contribution because I was just going to leave what I copied on post without interfering.

      Regards,
      TOLA.

      Like

      Reply

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