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President Trump’s America & its similarity to Nigeria’s constant political state of uncertainty -Ngozi Adichie

March 4, 2017

Arts & Culture, Women

 

“Someone said to me, ‘Now that this is happening in the US, do you think of moving back to Nigeria?’ And I thought, no, because it’s not any better there. I admire America. I don’t think of myself as American – I’m not. So it’s not mine. But I admire it, and so there’s a sense that this thing I built in my head, it’s been destroyed.”

You might have disagreed ideologically with George W Bush, but he still kind of followed the rules. Here, it feels like Nigeria. It really does. It’s that feeling of political uncertainty that I’m very familiar with, but not a feeling I like. It’s ugly. But even worse, because America is so powerful, and so much at the centre of the world, these things have consequences for everyone. Nigeria doesn’t have that kind of reach, so our problems remain our problems.”

READ THE ESSAY

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/mar/04/chimamanda-ngozi-adichie-stop-telling-me-feminism-hot

SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 2017. 8:57 p.m. [GMT]

 

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2 Comments on “President Trump’s America & its similarity to Nigeria’s constant political state of uncertainty -Ngozi Adichie”

  1. Adegoke G. Falade Says:

    I’ll comment on feminism, instead of trumpism, because the days of the latter are numbered.

    Although, Ngozi Adichie is now an international literature icon(she can even be a Nobel laureate in future), she has misfired.
    It is obvious she has not gained RECOGNITION on the meanings of female, womanhood and motherhood. She was right to SAY that marriage should not be the goal for a female, but, I doubt if that came from within her. She should tell us why we refer to our God as “He” and why He sent His Son to us, instead of His Daughter.

    Mind you, the Queen of Heaven, a divine being is a female. And finally, why is that the four archangels are males?

    I’m not a male chauvinist.

    A. G. Falade
    5 March 2017, 5.46 am

    Like

    Reply

    • emotan77 Says:

      Dear Prof.,

      I cannot stop laughing!

      First of all, I’m not sure there are many who would disagree with your view of “trumpism” longevity.

      Now, as for feminism, Chimamanda would have the votes of millions of women, including this blogger even though we may frame our narratives in different ways.

      While patriarchy reigns not only in Nigeria but in most of the world – might is right – and especially among the major faiths, especially Christianity and Islam, it does not remove the fact that those who fought for women’s right led a very noble and just cause.

      I think women have had to fight their individual battle in whichever set-up they embark on or are forced into by themselves, acceptance does not necessarily mean satisfaction. Each woman can decide whether she chooses career over a married life – many do including, surprisingly in societies of the world (like Nigeria and most of the developing world) where the women and other minorities have not much say about how their lives.

      Feminism does not mean the hardliner approaches – this is not a cop-out – but women’s cries that their needs, their aspirations, et cetera are not different from men’s and that their rights to these be taken seriously in the different societies they live in.

      Sincere regards,
      TOLA.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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