Advertisements

Nigeria’s Restructure: “… those who make peaceful change impossible make violent change inevitable” – Ṣẹgun Gbadegẹṣin echoes Kennedy’s immortal words

October 9, 2017

Nigeria

The matter of political restructuring continues to generate political heat in the public domain. It is not unusual to have the kind of robust debate that we have had especially since the beginning of the new administration of President Buhari.

There have been many attempts at obfuscation … There has been fear-mongering of the worst kind. A few weeks ago, I was at the annual convention of the National Association of Yoruba Descendants which had restructuring as a theme. While almost every speaker appeared to have a clear vision of what restructuring meant and what social and economic gains might accrue therefrom, there was a holdout … “The Southwest had no oil-fields”, he observed. “From where would our wealth come and how are we to feed our populations if advocates of restructuring had their way?”

 

Even for a party that made change its political totem, the pursuit of change could be unnerving. Who knows what is on the other side? And how does one manage the transition state between the undesirable present and the desirable future state? Every business organisation that seeks profitability must face these questions at some point. Does a political community that seeks stability and prosperity for her citizens need to worry about such issues? The answer is obvious.

There is, however, a major difference between a political community and a business organization. A business organization that refuses to change in the light of new developments and the competition around it, will collapse under the weight of its own redundancy.

On the other hand, in a political community, power is wielded by those who are entrusted with it, ideally on behalf of the people, but realistically for the interest of the powerful few. If business calculations feature at all, it is the business interests of the few that drive political calculations. Thus, the clamor for change may fall into deaf ears for fear of the unknown or for calculations of self-or sectional interests.

What is lost to those calculations is the inevitability of change which, as Heraclitus observes several millennia ago, is the only constant. Especially, in situations of universal frustration with the status quo, where life is akin to the state of nature condition, change is the only certainty. But in the eternal wisdom of J. F. Kennedy, those who make peaceful change impossible make violent change inevitable.

There have been many attempts at obfuscation. We manufacture confusion where there is none just so we could slow down or disrupt the course of change. There has been fear-mongering of the worst kind. A few weeks ago, I was at the annual convention of the National Association of Yoruba Descendants which had restructuring as a theme. While almost every speaker appeared to have a clear vision of what restructuring meant and what social and economic gains might accrue therefrom, there was a holdout. An otherwise smart and obviously learned gentleman expressed the fear of the unknown. “The Southwest had no oil-fields”, he observed. “From where would our wealth come and how are we to feed our populations if advocates of restructuring had their way?”

Note that this was a convention of a Southwest Nigerian organization in the most federalized nation in the world, where presidents and congressmen and women jealously guard state rights against the intrusion of federal might. I bring it up to show that in the current debate on restructuring, the resistance to change is not a sectional one. There are equal opportunity resisters in all the zones of the federation.

Resisters hide behind such platitudes as “we need mind-restructuring, not political restructuring”, “we must pursue poverty alleviation not political restructuring”, or “we need constitutional amendment not political restructuring.” Still others continue to ask for the meaning of restructuring, or they dismiss true federalism as nonsensical because, in their confused judgment, there is nothing like false federalism. But pray, how else does one describe a unitary system that camouflages as a federal system?

Restructuring is not secession … a demand is for an out of a marriage that both believe no longer works …

Restructuring is not against national unity. Advocates are some of the most patriotic and nationalistic groups whose love of country is beyond doubt.

Restructuring is not the imposition of the will of one group or section over others. In the first place, it is, in reality, impossible for advocates of restructuring to impose their will on the nation since their demand must go through the crucible of public opinion and be acceptable to all for it to be adopted as the law of the land.

READ THE WHOLE ESSAY

http://thepathfinderinternational.com/2017/10/06/segun-gbadegesin-in-whose-interest-is-political-restructuring/

MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2017. 2:22 P.M. [GMT]

Advertisements
, ,

Subscribe

Subscribe to our RSS feed and social profiles to receive updates.

3 Comments on “Nigeria’s Restructure: “… those who make peaceful change impossible make violent change inevitable” – Ṣẹgun Gbadegẹṣin echoes Kennedy’s immortal words”

  1. mr.johnsons.snapshots Says:

    Let us not forget, there at times, indeed in this country (USA) that time may be upon us, when “peaceful change” simply is not allowed, nor should it be, there are times when the sharp end of the sword is demanded (not that I am advocating such) by the dictates and actions of those who stand in the way and resist (in ways obvious and not so) said change. Indeed, such a change – peaceful – is always the first step required, but if said step is met/challenged by “force” then what should it be met with: a “smile”? restructing is both necessary and vital, but the majority of those with “wealth” have never – even in their wildest fever induced dreams – considered ‘sharing’ said wealth with those who have none; it’s how they hold on to what they consider power; a point that is not, (nor should it be) lost on them and those who oppose them, and yeah that include the participants in the “rent-a-crowd” who may be ‘bought’ but may also be ‘aware’ of the situation

    Like

    Reply

  2. mr.johnsons.snapshots Says:

    Let us not forget, there at times, indeed in this country (USA) that time may be upon us, when “peaceful change” simply is not allowed, nor should it be, there are times when the sharp end of the sword is demanded (not that I am advocating such) by the dictates and actions of those who stand in the way and resist (in ways obvious and not so) said change. Indeed, such a change – peaceful – is always the first step required, but if said step is met/challenged by “force” then what should it be met with: a “smile”? restructring is both necessary and vital, but the majority of those with “wealth” have never – even in their wildest fever induced dreams – considered ‘sharing’ said wealth with those who have none; it’s how they hold on to what they consider power; a point that is not, (nor should it be) lost on them and those who oppose them, and yeah that include the participants in the “rent-a-crowd” who may be ‘bought’ but may also be ‘aware’ of the situation

    Like

    Reply

    • emotan77 Says:

      Yes, as it is in Nigeria it apparently is in good ol’ USA and everywhere those at the top like to take advantage of the bottom “90%”, including the “participants in rent-a-crowd” who seem never to care – or know – where their interests really lie.
      No, no average person wants to deal using “the sharp end of the sword” to borrow words from one who must be a veteran of one of the zillions of Uncle Sam’s [mis]adventures but those who may be forced to do so would not be “average” by any interpretation of the word.
      The clock is ticking for the hard-of-hearing in Nigeria’s ruling class.

      Regards,
      TOLA.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

Leave comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: