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Yoruba classic clothes at weddings: Sanyan, Etu & Alaari – Tola Adenle

March 24, 2013

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Some Yoruba words to keep in mind Iro                                           A wrap-per.  Aso Oke requires from twelve to fifteen pieces of the woven material depending on woman’s size. Buba                 […]

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Yoruba Aso Oke: 2013 Oje (Ibadan) & Oje (Ede) Market Days – Tola Adenle

January 25, 2013

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Dear Readers, I note an increase in the visits to the market days for last year which is in line with more than dozen views to check out various aso oke essays, including those written in 2011.  I’ve been away and just returned this past week.  I understand there is a market day tomorrow, Saturday, […]

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Yoruba Aso Oke: Oje-Ibadan & Oje-Ede Market Days, 2012 (2)

July 17, 2012

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In February, I posted information from an almanac I purchased at Oje-Ibadan for this year’s market days.  Since then, I’ve had some inquiries from readers concerning the days of certain market days.  One of the comments waiting for me this morning – below – was given a prompt response, thanks to internet access cooperation! Here […]

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Yoruba Aso Oke: Oje – Ibadan & Ede – Market Days 2012 – Tola Adenle

February 2, 2012

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While you can get the Yoruba woven fabrics in most markets as well as small shops throughout Southwestern Nigeria, there are places to go when you need bulk purchases, or, if you are like me, you like to browse through tons of designs, both old and new, and then go home with armful of loved […]

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Yoruba Classic Aso Oke (3 of 3, contd): Alaari [Ondo Variation] – Tola Adenle

September 29, 2011

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As I promised, I’m posting two wonderful pictures from a wedding day sent by someone I know to add to the collection on Alaari, one of the three classic Yoruba aso oke or ofi, which I recently had occasion to point out is a generic name – like aso oke – for all hand-woven Yoruba […]

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Yoruba Classic Aso Oke [3 of 3]: Alaari – Tola Adenle

September 16, 2011

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This is perhaps the most interesting of the three great classics.  Yeah, interesting may be a vague word but it’s the only word that comes to my mind as I write this.  Pardon me, I’m going to take a shot at the pronunciation but it’s NOT going to be that accurate: ALA (both ‘A‘s are […]

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Yoruba Classic Aso oke (2 of 3), comprising all previously written on Etu – Tola Adenle

September 8, 2011

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Etu – pronounce the ‘e’ (as in the ‘e’ of ‘epic’ – and tu as in ‘too [e-tu] is considered by many as the Number Three among the three classics although many also consider it Number Two.  I’ve generally gone with my Alaso oke – the weaver – at Iseyin for calls on Yoruba cloths […]

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The Yoruba Clothes, continued – Tola Adenle

September 8, 2011

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The interest that this Blog continues to generate on the Yoruba classic clothes not only heartens me greatly but also challenges me to generate people’s interest more to Yoruba textiles and clothes as the late Ulli Beier’s  Collection at Amherst College in the United States started my interest to documenting everything I know and even […]

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Yoruba Classic Aso Oke (1 of 3) – Sanyan – Tola Adenle

September 1, 2011

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Just this past week, seven readers visited the Blog to check out “Cloth wears to shreds:  Yoruba textile photographs from the Beier Collection” while there is always a reader – just for pleasure, just for information or research – who is interested in “sanyan”, “alaari” or “etu” referred to the Blog via search engines. I […]

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Yoruba Textiles –a short note FYI – Tola Adenle

July 15, 2011

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The two essays on Ulli Beier – with perhaps the exceptions of the recent two on the Williams Sisters – have been this Blog’s most read.  When I saw a search engine term yesterday morning with “Yoruba sanyan”, I knew it’s become not only imperative but urgent to get these photographed and shown very soon […]

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